Education

Icon for Resources posts

Photoshop Keyboard Shortcuts

I’ve been using Photoshop now for 20 years, version one on a Mac while I was studying at college back in 92-93, and a lot has changed since those early days. But one thing that I quickly learnt, especially when I started working in a commercial setting was that using keyboard shortcuts were essential.

 

Once you begin employing keyboard shortcuts rather than hunting for tools and features in the myriad of menus your productivity skyrockets. I would guess that using the keyboard will allow me to complete a task in anything from a half to a third of the time that it would if I just used the mouse.

(more…)

Icon for Education posts

Inovatative use of Twitter to teach history

Icon for Education postsAn innovative project using twitter to teach history, Winchester House School in collaboration with other schools and colleges set up a twitter feed where each took on a persona in the gunpowder plot and tweeted in character to unveil the story of the plot and it’s events as a teaching aid for their pupils. Winchester House School who were running this web page http://winchesterhouse.wordpress.com/2010/11/08/gunpowder-tweeting-and-plot/ The Twitter feed http://twitter.com/#!/chrisleach78/gunpowdertweetingplot This sort of approach could easily be applied to creative writing or even as part of a performance, a novel way of developing a story plotline and character backgrounds before even a work of the story/script itself is written!

Icon for Education posts

28 interesting ways to use QR codes in the classroom

Icon for Education postsI recently came across this excellent resource on QR Codes by Tom Barrett for those of you not familiar with QR codes here is the Wikipedia definition of them.

A QR Code is a matrix barcode (or two-dimensional code), readable by QR scanners, mobile phones with a camera, and smartphones. The code consists of black modules arranged in a square pattern on white background. The information encoded can be text, URL or other data. Common in Japan, where it was created by Toyota subsidiary Denso-Wave in 1994, the QR code is one of the most popular types of two-dimensional barcodes. QR is the abbreviation for Quick Response, as the creator intended the code to allow its contents to be decoded at high speed.

They are gaining in popularity in education but as with many new technologies there is much confusion and misunderstanding about them. Below is a link to a Google Docs’ presentation covering 28 uses of QR code in the classroom and I recommend you take a look if you’re thinking of using them or just want to know what their all about. Presentation link: http://goo.gl/Pgq8s Wikipedia page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QR_Code

Icon for Education posts

Stanley Fish: The Value of Higher Education Made Literal

Icon for Education postsA fascinating article from the New York Times journalist Stanley Fish on the value of higher education, very relevant to the UK in the light of current changes. A thought provoking commentary on how many people reach their potential not through choice but through opportunity as how many of us really know what we want to do or be till those doors are opened and we are welcomed through and how the ‘logic of privatization’ under the guise of consumer choice is changing the face of our educational system from being conceived as a public good to that of a privet benefit. A sad irony that such an article appeared in an American publication and now here in the UK. http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/12/13/the-value-of-higher-education-made-literal/

Go to Top