Icon for history & folklore postsA private project done in Blender 2.5 to reconstruct the ancient Greek Acropolis of Pergamon.

 

 

 


This is a private visualization project of the acropolis of ancient Pergamum done entirely in Blender 2.5. There certainly is room for improvement and it will develop if time permits.

The excavations at Pergamon in the 19th century were a prestige project of 19th century Germany struggling to catch up politically and culturally with its European Neighbours.

Luckily the results of these campaigns are painstakingly documented in juicy old German, beautifully illustrated and – what’s best – available online.

The larger part of the findings, most notably the remains of “The Great Altar”, were acquired from Turkey at a time when it had little interest in its pagan, hellenistic heritage. They still reside within the Pergamon Museum in Berlin up to this day.

Contrary to other ancient cities like Athens or Rome there were no notable 3D visualizations of Pergamon to be found around the web, so the city looked like an ideal platform to dig a little deeper into 3D techniques for private pleasure without having to compare the result with a perfectly executed hollywood production. ;-) …unfortunately there is an official highly-budgeted visualization project going on now … well, that’s life.

After some experiments with Google Sketchup, Blender 2.5 came out just at the right time last Spring. This 2 minute camera flight is a first result.

Other scenes are “half” finished but not good enough to show yet.

Dank je wel to everyone who builds, maintains documents an supports this beautiful and powerful software!

Links

Project homepage

This is a private visualization project of the acropolis of ancient Pergamum done entirely in Blender 2.5. There certainly is room for improvement and it will develop if time permits.

The excavations at Pergamon in the 19th century were a prestige project of 19th century Germany struggling to catch up politically and culturally with its European Neighbours.

Luckily the results of these campaigns are painstakingly documented in juicy old German, beautifully illustrated and – what’s best – available online.

The larger part of the findings, most notably the remains of “The Great Altar”, were acquired from Turkey at a time when it had little interest in its pagan, hellenistic heritage. They still reside within the Pergamon Museum in Berlin up to this day.

Contrary to other ancient cities like Athens or Rome there were no notable 3D visualizations of Pergamon to be found around the web, so the city looked like an ideal platform to dig a little deeper into 3D techniques for private pleasure without having to compare the result with a perfectly executed hollywood production. ;-) …unfortunately there is an official highly-budgeted visualization project going on now … well, that’s life.

After some experiments with Google Sketchup, Blender 2.5 came out just at the right time last Spring. This 2 minute camera flight is a first result.

Other scenes are “half” finished but not good enough to show yet.

Dank je wel to everyone who builds, maintains documents an supports this beautiful and powerful software!

Share and Enjoy:
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • del.icio.us
  • Tumblr
  • StumbleUpon
  • Netvibes
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Digg
  • MySpace
  • Diigo
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • RSS
  • Add to favorites
  • Print
  • PDF
  • email

Creative Commons License
3D Reconstruction of Pergamon by Blayn Parkinson, unless otherwise expressly stated, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.